Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
MSNBCW 12
CNNW 4
KPIX (CBS) 4
CSPAN 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
and republicans that education is the solution to the problem. if we just figure out better to educate our poor kids we could reduce the inequality. and the president today acknowledged that may not be enough. >> the outcomes we're having today, the health care, the budget, reforming our financial systems, all of these things will have a practical effect on americans, i am convinced the decisions we make in the next few years, will determine whether or not america will be the country where children can grow up and have opportunities that are real. >> i have seen you talk about your work in education as fundamentally driven towards precisely the kinds of goals the president talks about today. reducing inequality. expanding social mobility. and i wonder what your take is on how much of that can be achieved through education, while we have seen outside the schools such a massively expanding amount of poor people. >> yeah, i think part of the problem that we have in the debate today is that people think that you either have to solve the problem of poverty through social programs or it is all about
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. is what makes us different. we take the time to get to know you and your unique health needs. then we help create a personalized healthcare experience that works for you. and you. and you. with 50 years of know-how, and a dedicated network of doctors, health coaches, and wellness experts, we're a partner you can rely on -- today, and tomorrow. we're going beyond insurance to become your partner in health. humana. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping
, but stronger labor laws, more funding for education and a social safety net. >> but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. the combined trends of increase and equality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> susan page is the washington bureau chief for usa today. clarence page, no relation, pulitzer prize-winning columnist and it's the first time we've had the pages squared on my show. >> it's great to have both of you. the president ticked off the statistics to how a growing number of americans face the reality of lower, real wages and higher costs. the prospect of a next generation with fewer opportunities for economic advancements that all to me sounds like, susan, a lot of the rhetoric from his 2008 campaign. why this push now and why the prospects of change now? >> i think it dates back to the 2008 presidential campaign and these their is wha
. >> pelley: nelson mandela once said education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. jim axelrod found that message changed the hearts of some american students. >> reporter: when nelson mandela visited madison park high school in roxbury, massachusetts, in 1990 the crowd went wild. eager to hear his words of wisdom. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. >> reporter: a 16-year-old sophomore in the gymnasium that day. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. and at the time that was one of the things that really stuck to my head. so this day i try to instill the same concept in my students. >> reporter: mandela's speech was a turning point in dipina's young life. he decided he too wanted to lead from the classroom as a teacher. >> okay. the word freedom, but freedom is not free. >> reporter: now he's a history teacher at brighton high school in boston, hoping to a model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's suc
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
the real problem here is public education, if you have never had health insurance before, you don't know how it works and you've never applied for it and never done anything, you need to be educated and there's a whole lot of people out there who have not had health insurance before or how to use it. >> there are a lot of people who don't have computers and a lot of people are watching television about this sort of thing, so you have a real public education problem that goes with any major social change like this. it was no different for social security or for medicare or for the drug benefit under medicare. there's always a lot of education that has to be done. >> we know that there's a renewed sense of confidence certainly coming from the white house and certainly coming from democrats who have been anxious about this, and i know that as of tuesday in your state more than 175,000 residents have enrolled in health care coverage since october 1st and we know since november 14th, enrollments have increased by 55%. in your opening remarks from yesterday's committee hearing from the aca imp
activist and founder of free the children, focused on education and breaking the cycle of poverty. he's a winner of the nelson mandela leadership award and spent time with africa's greatest son. train the child in the way he should go and when he's old he will not depart from it. my father tells me my first protest about anti-apartheid when i was only two, of course, i don't remember that. but talk about the mandela legacy to you and young people all over the world, particularly those who may only read about all of his accomplishments online and in books. >> he inspired a generation here in south africa, you see children who are laying roses. they were waist high, writing poems and laying them at the staut tus. when you engage young people across the world filling stadiums, this year showing images of stadiums full of kids seeing them stand and chieer in ovation, and raising funds to build 100 schools to honor mandela. something they started six months ago. so he inspired a generation who's continuing his legacy to this day. >> craig, nelson mandela no doubt was a tremendous inspirati
. here he is. >> i'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the g.i. bill. when my father left and my mom hit hard times trying to raise my sister and me while she was going to school, this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary, wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back. so what drives me as a son, a grandson, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, on the mystic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> this is why he was elected, right then. because that grabbed me. the idea we came here and got on the escalator and got better off in this country than we would have gotten in whatever country we came from. the g.i. bill, these are opportunities that we get in this country to move up that escalator. and he was saying i was one of the people who went up that way. we can't stop that escalator. that grabbed me. but i get the feeling sometimes they're afraid t
ground needs to include several things. smart deficit reduction and investments in education. we have to cut spending and it has to be fair to the middle class. if the position will be to turn off sequester which we must do, we will ask to pay to turn off sequester. that's not going to suit the democrats in congress. we will continue to negotiate and hope that we get to a good fair common ground that is good and fair of the middle class. >> when you say the middle class, what are you referencing to that they have to pay for? >> one of the things is a surcharge on airline tickets. in the context of an overall budget if we have to look at that, we should. to do that and ask middle class people who are traveling to visit with their families. this has to do better than that. >> one question i want to ask you about, when you are not on capitol hill, you moonlight to get democrats elect and get the 17 seats needed to reclaim the majority. a person who has gone out of his way to help you is the president of the united states. they say that the president has not turned down a single fund rais
and children as we do, they want a roof over their head, feed and educate them. >> reporter: three years ago it was her family trip to south america that inspired stacey to do something. >> the poverty that i saw in peru in contrast with the beauty of the people and how colorful it was and all of the artistic talent there, i came back struggling with what can i do to help? >> reporter: she got to work raising money and started a nonprofit called "shopping for a change." >> so i developed a web-based platform where we sell the artisans' products. they are paid right up front. it's all fair trade. once we get everything in, i have to price it and tag it and organize it. >> reporter: her garage studio is now a stockroom. when you buy something on stacey's website, the money does three things. it pays the artist. it supports the community project where they live. and it contributes to a u.s. nonprofit that you select when you check out. >> it's great to want to help these people in these underdeveloped countries but we also need help here at home and i didn't want to ignore that. >> reporter: wh
under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ >>> it has been the one major storm cloud hanging over college football this season, the most important player, jamison winstons with florida state regarding important stuff, rape or consensual stuff? it's a complex investigation. the prosecutors said there was not enough evidence to support charging winston, a hen ate by the woman involved had been drinking and her recollection was somewhat broken. dna was of another male was found, complicating things as well. christine brittan has written extens
to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the american dream is built on limited government and economic freedom. policies can be put in place, growth policies, tax cuts, corporate taxes being cut to get that growth going so everybody has an equal shot at prosperity. martha: let's take a look at some of these numbers. just verbally -- 1 per when asked what's the most important issue to you? 1% of the 18-29-year-olds thought that was important. jobs, unemployment rate, 7
be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should offend all of us. to take money from the haves and give it to the have nots, that's not what's best. ♪ >> be off with you! >> christmas is a time of generosi generosity. >> what other secular humanists are peeing on your you'll log. >> convince people saying that jesus would feed the poor which he would. we all know that. but would he impose a system that hurts one group to help another group? >> the top 10 percent no longer takes in one-third of our income. and now takes half. >> hum bug. >> it's this theoretical world that president obama seems to live in. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. did i just hear bill o'reilly say something about people are hurting? that jesus would want to help the poor, but he wouldn't want to hurt anybody else? you mean to tell me that bill o'reilly, who is looking out for us, thinks that the wealthiest americans are hurting right now? oh, i'll tell you what. food stamps, ju
's still a lot of problems. there's defacto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socioeconomic levels they are talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half hour. >>> another headline, the investigation in to she shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
education because people who get, in the middle east get a decent education don't automatically sign up for the 7th century. the second problem was, of course it, when president obama utterly failed to take any retaliatory action after the slaughter of our ambassador and three other americans in benghazi last year, it became open season on americans. so it was really own a matter of time until this truly heroic, quietly heroic young man's life was cut short. bill: i want to make this point clear. we do not know if he was a victim of a crime or if he was truly targeted by islamists in benghazi 24 hours ago. but more to the point about what islamists do not like about werners teaching people in their country is what, colonel? >> well, you know, modern science and chemistry doesn't match the philosophies and religious beliefs the middle ages, it just doesn't but there's this, call this mad rage against things western even as terrorists are welcome willing to use our technologies. but bill, i have to say two things. i don't believe this young man was target of a robbery type crime because h
said, okay, and then she said, well, that's good, that's a nice education, you know, for literature and things like that. and i said, no, i believe it. and she sort of said, okay. >> the reactions to your piece and whether it surprised you. >> very positive. yeah, i was surprised. i got so many e-mails. i even heard from some of my friends who are atheists who were interested in it and appreciated it and were inspired by it. so, yeah, i was really welcome and a nice response. >> kirsten powers. still to come, our news december income new york standing by to give you the latest on that deadly train derailment in the bronx. >>> in the meantime, check out our show's facebook page. we're constantly posting content and having conversations there. >>> up next, why fake twitter followers has become a big business. and how one newspaper is combining journalism and marijuana. >>> if you're in this business, you like to have as many viewers as possible. if you're on twitter, you want to have as many followers as possible. but it turns out millions of these twitter accounts are, well, fake. cr
it will be implemented. ashington journal, live every on ing at 7:00 a.m. eastern c-span. >> the house education examines the college of affordability and the pell grant program. at 10:00 e it live a.m. eastern on c-span 3. eastern, juan manuel santos speaks at the the nal press club about economic and political situation in colombia. that's also live on c-span 3. >> as you walk in, there are tables out in front with lots of right?ts, not the -- prior to entering the gun show. how he pamphlets are about the government is trying to take away the right to own guns and the government is doing this, that. is doing obama care is terrible. those were the guys that i wanted to talk to. were the guys with the leaflets, with the ideas. like this yourself. you?id who are i said i'm a -- i'm an academic. i'm a researcher. the researcher on these rganizations and these ideas and try to understand the guys. and study the men who believe this stuff. said -- they m looked at me. they asked me questions. here's what i ok, am. i don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to u
cuts and democrats want to restore educational money and medical sesearch. how they would pay for it. and the republicans are not happy about the spending and bill written behind closed doors. >> paul ryan came in and gave us an update and i hope they work it out. there is cleel no agreement. >> no agreement and the senate is still out on the thanks giving recess and will not be back until next week. and then the house goes on vacation for the week. it leaves only five work days in which the house and senate will be in the capitol building together. and the budget is not only the problem. there is a desput over the farm bill and if they don't fix it. dairy subsidies will expire. and they deal with a defense authorization bill and that is green light to pay the military next year and ongoing battle that democrats are trying to extend unemployment benefits. and yet the benefits are extended four years in a row and a lot of republicans that it are scaling that back. look for a lot of cans to get kicked down the road and look for a shutdown. >> they better not take a lunch break. >> five
that can have the education and provide the lifestyle that they need to have. but he chose, god chose him to go to that country. to do something. from the comments that we received from the children, and the students and the people that knew him, his goal was accomplished. did he touch people's lives. he did make life different for all the people that he touched. not only here in america but also in libya. >> his family was already back in the u.s. when this happened. do you know how they're doing? >> i'm sure they're shocked and disbelief. i believe the church will have a special service on sunday where his wife and his son will be present there at the church. it will be very touching. because we loved him. and he had the greatest hug, the biggest smile ever. and his life was like he played tennis. no matter he was 6-0, he would run people that played him against him. he was challenged and always come up the best that he could on the tennis court and off the tennis court. i think that's the life he led and the life he wanted to continue living. even in a dangerous situation. >> we feel s
educated. >> i'm not the biggest quoter of gallup but the over well ing majority of americans want it repealed or major changes. whien won't the president say, you know what, i made promises we can't keep. why don't we cut our losses and debate this to get a system you would buy into. >> you know what, i think the president made it clear he has always wanted further debate and input. setting the aside, i feel that way. there's never been a major law passed that didn't need to be revised and amended. >> david. >> every one. >> he says we are not going back on this no matter how many people it hurt. >> he said, not while i'm president. >> he couldn't be more clear. >> it doesn't matter what he said. look what he does. >> at least you came off of that. >> he did say we are not going back. he doesn't intend to go back. he intended to hurt people because he knew -- >> for what reason? >> to advance statism and redistribution. i'm serious. >> which people -- >> there was collateral damage. he hurt them because he was hell bent on socialized medicine. i believe that. >> really? i don't th
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patientadvocae for one-to-one support and education. on the table by not choosing the rit medicare d plan. no one could hav left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors whoompare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs prmacist, ll, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized pl comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. >>> welcome back, everybody. now for the latest on our developing story. 85-year-old u.s. war veteran merrill newman is now back at home after north korea releases him after more than a month in captivity. joining us now is an experienced negotiator with north korean authorities, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. and new mexico governor bill richardson. welcome, sir. great to have you here today. >> thank you. nice to be with you. >> why do you think north korea finally decided to let newman go after all this time? >> well, i believe they realized that their value to them had expired. they
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> welcome back to a special edition of "new day." we start again, of course, with the passing of nelson mandela. you're looking at live pictures down in south africa. the news is sad to be sure but it is also definitely reason for celebration, because of the life and legacy of nelson mandela. people have been gathering outside his house. you will hear now singing, chanting, because remember, the greatest example of nelson mandela was the epitome of learning how to have joy in your heart even through the greatest of adversity. that's what we're seeing in south africa being echoed around the world and continuing to grow as word spreads of the passing of this great leader. we have arwa damon there outside the celebration. what's the latest from there, arwa? >> reporter: it's quite incredible to be out h
think we've got to educate our communities and say this is unacceptable and should not be done. >> all right. we'll be watching that one as it unfolds. lee saunders, thank you so much for your time tonight. >> thanks for having me. >> we'll be right back. we're aig. and we're here. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide. with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor o
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. it's donut friday at the office. aso every friday morning they psend me out to get the goods. but what they don't know is that i'm using my citi thankyou card at the coffee shop, so i get 2 times the points. and those points add up fast. so, sure, make me the grunt. 'cause i'll be using those points to help me get to a beach in miami. and allllllll the big shots will be stuck here at the cube farm. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards >>> i'm milissa rehberger. a union official says the engineer of a train that derailed in new york caught himself nodding off just before a sharp curve. >>> a federal judge says detroit can declare bankruptcy. it allows detroit to cut employee pensions. lawmakers in illinois passed a bill overhauling the state's pension system which is $100 billion in debt. the measure in part cuts benefits to workers and retirees. back to "hardball." ♪ >>> welcome back to "hardball." after the republi
for foreigners, any westerners, to be inside benghazi? any idea, he must be committed to education. why was they that area? why did he teach that the school? what was behind his mission, if you will? >> reporter: it's hard to know with clarity at the moment. what we do know, reports coming from students, that are coming from the principal there, saying that he was a very, very sweet man, students there posting on social media saying that he was dedicated to them, that he made a difference to only bright light in everything happening to them in benghazi, he appears to be a man very dedicated to helping young libyans aspire to their dreams. >> nic, thanks for that. nic robertson, reporting for us from new york. somebody who spent a bit of time in libya. just seems odd to be in public in benghazi given what's happened there. >> unfortunate story for the situation there. >>> of course the pope making more news. >> every day. >> setting to fight child sex abuse in the catholic church head onnen assembling a pan toll advise him on protecting children frpedophile. >> this is after the pope met
certainly is are -- in the broader use of i.t. and businesses and health care and education, real need for innovation and software and data centers and being able to make use of all this information and have it create better outcomes for patients for students to solve all the challenges that are out there. and so we have been building really changed the company quite dramatic will i in the last five years and building a whole new set of capabilities, and we'll invest in those further as a private company without an on session, short-term results with focus on the long term. >> i want to go back to charlie's point about the bruising battle for a second. it did get a little nasty with carl icahn. i wonder how you feel about him. next time are you going to invite him out to lunch, say i like your shoes, or this is how it goes. >> i don't think i'll be -- >> or like your tie. you know what i mean. >> let's go to dinner. >> come over to my house for christmas. >> you know what i mean. it got a little heated between the two of you. >> you know, this is the largest c
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? >>> after four days of losses, all three major u.s. stock indices closed up today on news of a better than expected november jobs report. the u.s. added 203,000 jobs in november, that's about 20,000 more than had been expected and the unemployment fell to 7% from 7.3%. that's the lowest level in five years. our senior white house correspondent jim acosta is joining us now. jim, it looks like the job market may, i repeat may finally be hitting some sort of stride. >> that's right, wolf. there's no shortage of new data showing the economy is strengthening but the white house is being careful about taking too much credit for that trend, because too many americans are not feeling it. it's more proof the u.s. economy is heating up. accordin
using education apps but they fear parents will use it as a babysitter. fisher price says parent dos have the option of using the product without the ipad. is is the same thing people say about movies. my nieces, if they wch nemo one more time. that's the debate. >> but i bet your nieces aren't strapped in. >> wn it's right here. >> that baby has no choice. >> but if youe putting educational things on it. >> it'still e habit of having the visual right re and not engaging or reading a book. >> are we not embracing technology? none of us still use the brick cell phone. >> your baby starts ordering stuff from amazon. >> i d't know. i don't know. >> speaking ofipads, president obama has o but there's another amevice he is not even allowed to use. >> am not allowed for security reasons to have an iphone. i have noticed thatsash aa an and meliapend a lot of time on it. >> the president is a famously loyal customer. >> so why does the leader of the free wor carry around a device from 2007? because the super secure blackberry is extremely difficult to hack into. the president also said that
are going to have to get up and understand this program. it is going to take a while for the educational process to work. we will put a small fine on this year of a few dollars. $95. guest: the next year, the fine goes up. and the next year. there will be increasing pressure to get everybody in. the reason is very simple. to need healthg care at some time or other for something. the idea that i can wait until i am sick and then i will jump in, that means you're a free rider. if you are in an automobile accident, who pays for it? host: was it shortsighted to have a small penalty the first year given the problems we have seen? what if people do not sign up because they sated paoli is $95, i will pay that -- because they say the penalty is $95, i will pay that? guest: that is a political decision. should have been $5,000 or five dollars. we picked 95. if it was $200, more people would want to get in. you would have had the initial bill coming out with a $500 fine if you don't sign up. jumping up in the air about that. was it the right number, i don't know? host: how did you -- did you come
democrats, they want to increase spending on medical research and education. so, therefore, you're going to have some type of difference in opinion on where we increase spending and where we cut spending. jon: every household in america has, you know, virtually every household has really been through the wringer ever since the financial crisis of 2008. virtually everybody has taken a hard look at their budgets, cut a little bit here, a little bit there. why can't -- why is it so tough to do the same thing in washington? why is it so tough to impose, say, a spending freeze on all federal agencies or, god forbid, even a spending cut? >> because unfortunately, jon, we have put politics in this washington, d.c. over policy. you have lobbyists on capitol hill chomping at the bit because they want to protect their special interests. but members of congress need to do their job and now put policy over politics because self-preservation is the first law of nature, and if today don't do their job and if we have another very public government shutdown, i believe that people are going to vote their
a mission. that mission is an educational product for which the taxpayers paid and students can't interfere with that mission. but where the school is not able to show interference the default position is the freedom of speech. the default position is the freedom of religion and this school board has not been able to show any interference with the delivery of the school's mission by this young woman passing out this literature. >> here's the problem with the school's statement. if they say you can't pass anything out because of a safety issue, why are they okay with posters glorifying dead rappers and drugs and alcohol? >> that probably gets into the political aspect of this. again, i don't know the motivation -- >> if you're talking about safety, drugs and alcohol not necessarily safe. >> i don't know the motivation. i certainly don't know what's in the hearts of the people who wrote this regulation. but it's hard to believe that they would have a regulation that would permit you to distribute literature about dead rappers but not distribute literature about jesus christ. >> here's a state
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)